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About

I discovered a love for clay in my teens and always wanted to be a maker.  Life ultimately took me along a different path but I continued to be drawn back to working with clay and eventually studied ceramics at Havering college and UCA Farnham. I was finally able to pursue my original passion and become a full-time maker in 2020.  

The theme of my current work has been influenced by my involvement in counselling and pastoral work and each vessel represents a 'life story'.  The decoration and marks symbolise the significant events we encounter and acknowledges the lasting impact they can have.

I throw various vessel forms from white earthenware clay adding marks and indentations.  I decorate the surface using coloured slips, oxides and underglazes and randomly apply glaze to the surface. I also add gilt to the surface which is a reference to the Japanese art of 'Kintsugi" the restoring of a broken pot with gold. This much-loved metaphor for our lives is a reminder to stay hopeful when things fall apart and to celebrate all that we overcome.

 

I discovered a love for clay in my teens and always wanted to be a maker. Life ultimately took me along a different path but I continued to be drawn back to working with clay until I finally decided to pursue my original passion and become a full-time maker in 2019.  

Having been involved with pastoral care and counselling over many years I’m interested in how the events of life impact and alter us, often leaving us forever changed.  I believe that however imperfect and marked we are, every life is valuable. 

​'There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you’ – Maya Angelou 

​Each piece I make represents a life story.  I throw various vessel forms using white earthenware clay as a blank 'canvas'.   The altered forms and indentations symbolise the knocks and scars collected along the way.  I continue to layer spontaneous marks in coloured slip to acknowledge those unforgettable moments and experiences that last a lifetime.  Glaze is applied randomly to allow a contrasting surface of both the rough and smooth. The final layer is gilt which references 'Kintsugi' the art of mending a treasured but broken pot with gold, rendering it all the more precious.   This is a much-used metaphor for our own lives - a reminder to stay hopeful when things fall apart and celebrate what we learn from life's challenges and pitfalls.

​'Kintsugi is not the art of erasure – the invisible mend, the erasing of a mistake – but rather the marking of a loss.’  Edmund de Waal

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About 

I discovered a love for clay in my teens and always wanted to be a maker.  Life ultimately took me along a different path but I continued to be drawn back to working with clay until I finally decided to pursue my original passion and become a full-time maker in 2019.  

Having been involved with pastoral care and counselling over many years I’m interested in how the events of life impact and alter us, often leaving us forever changed.  I believe that however imperfect and marked we are, every life is valuable. 

 

​'There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you’ – Maya Angelou 

​Each piece I make represents a life story.  I throw various vessel forms using white earthenware clay as a blank 'canvas'.   The altered forms and indentations symbolise the knocks and scars collected along the way.  I continue to layer spontaneous marks in coloured slip to acknowledge those unforgettable moments and experiences that last a lifetime.  Glaze is applied randomly to allow a contrasting surface of both the rough and smooth. The final layer is gilt which references 'Kintsugi' the art of mending a treasured but broken pot with gold, rendering it all the more precious.   This is a much-used metaphor for our own lives - a reminder to stay hopeful when things fall apart and celebrate what we learn from life's challenges and pitfalls.

'Kintsugi is not the art of erasure – the invisible mend, the erasing of a mistake – but rather the marking of a loss.’ Edmund de Waal